Saturday, August 29, 2015

Look Ma, No Flip!



I wish I could read Japanese, to better appreciate all the Japanese tatting books available now. If anyone can read the language, and I'm getting this wrong, please let me know.

After a careful study of the photos in Tatting Lace Accessories by Kou Nanami, I came to the conclusion there are no flipped stitches in this book.  First I see direct tatted chains, and that's not too surprising, since that method seems to be growing in popularity. (That's the method where you hold the core thread taut and make wrapped, unflipped stitches to form the chain.)  It was the rings that boggled my mind, as they too seem unflipped, a new-to-me type of mock ring.

She holds a loop of the core thread and wraps one stitch over both threads of the loop and then makes the rest of the ring wrapping into the loop.  When done, close the ring by pulling on the core thread.



I made one tiny sample, and it works.  I prefer regular tatting, but this could be a big break through for some one who wants to shuttle tat and has been unable to master the flip.

Of course, you could look at the diagrams and tat the patterns using whichever method you prefer.  It is a very pretty little book and has some oya style flowers in it.

17 comments:

  1. That is very interesting, like a new way of a false ring! I like it. P.S. there is a free language app for phone and you hold the phone to the text and it will translate it for you! I like it! and there is one you can send a copy of text to computer and it will translate it too but i like the app it is easier! I love the Japanese books view tatting and there patterns are fun and interesting!

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    1. That may be a good reason for getting a smart phone, which I have avoided before.

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    2. Please, please, please... share more information about this app! I want to be able to read my Japanese books, too!

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  2. Fascinating! Thanks for the cool explanation.
    Katie V in NC

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  3. This is so interesting !!! Teri Dusenbury also did those directional rings with unflipped stitches, but this is yet another technique ! Will try it out ..... Thanks for sharing :-)

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    1. I knew she did chains that way, but I didn't realize she did rings too. I remember now, there is also an unflipped method in Rebecca Jone's book, but I think this is different.

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    2. Teri's rings were 'true rings' & she called them SQDR (Split Quadruple Directional Ring, if I remember right).

      But the ones you have diagrammed, are different, much simpler to do --- and they are not 'true rings' but more like a chain that has been locked at the base with one ds to form a ring shape..... like Carollyn said - a new way to make false rings.
      I like this method & hope to use it .

      I don't know about Rebecca Jone's method.

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  4. Interesting! It could be useful for colour work too, getting a specific colour where you want it?

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  5. Thanks for sharing, Martha! I tend to just look at the pretty pictures in my Japanese books. I have managed to tat a few simple motifs, but I have been baffled by some of the diagrams. I'll have to do more research!

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  6. It's the first time I read that. Thank you!

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  7. Very interesting and something that might be useful.
    Margaret

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  8. Yes maybe the author doesn´t know, how to flip the stitches.
    But I think, this method is not so fast as flipped knots.
    ♥ Petra

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  9. This is actually not a tatting book, it's a Turkish oya book, although it's usually sold with tatting books. The title is メキッキオヤのアクセサリー "Mekik Oya Accessories". In oya the stitches aren't flipped. If you look up "mekik oya" or "mekik oyasi" on YouTube you can see how it's done without flipping.

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  10. Sorry, I should have said this is a _mekik_ oya book (since I understand 'oya' in Turkish means 'lace'). The author does know what she's doing - she has a couple of other books out on various Turkish oya techniques.

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  11. I never meant to imply that she did not know what she was doing. I thought her method was interesting.

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  12. To clarify - I was just responding to the last comment before mine, not your original post. :)

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  13. So now I'm really confused. I've heard of unflipped stitches but to tat a whole ring unflipped? Wow! Going to have to YouTube that all I can learn it.

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